Information for Owners

So your pet is getting a Holter monitor attached, how does this affect you?

  • It is best to get a Holter monitor attached to your dog whilst you are available to supervise them. Whilst the Holter monitor is in your possession you are liable for any damage.
  • If you are worried that your pet may chew or damage the Holter monitor you can either put on a buster collar or take off the Holter when you leave them. Some veterinary surgeons are happy to hospitalise your pet for the duration of the recording but this may affect your pets behaviour and therefore the recording is less likely to be representative of their usual heart rate and rhythm.
  • It is essential that a small amount of hair (approximately 10cm by 10cm) is clipped from your pet’s chest for this procedure to allow the adhesive pads to have good contact with the skin.
  • The Holter monitor is placed inside a pocket within a specially adapted vest. The wires that run from the monitor to the adhesive pads should not be visible – any spare wire can be loosely coiled and held within the pocket next to the monitor – this is to prevent damage to the leads and also to prevent the dog’s legs getting tangled in the leads.
  • Whilst the Holter monitor is attached you will be given a diary sheet to fill in and the more information that you can fill in the better.
  • It is still possible for your pet to carry on its normal exercise routine but don’t let them near water especially if they enjoy a swim. The fleece jacket is only water resistant so if it is raining heavily please postpone your walk.
  • If the Holter monitor starts beeping whilst attached it usually means there is a problem which is likely to be that the adhesive pads have become dislodged. Please look under the vest and check that all 3 pads are firmly in place with the leads attached.
  • It may be necessary to replace the electrodes especially if the Holter monitor is on for 7 days. If the Holter monitor is still beeping then contact your vet for more advice.
  • If you are responsible for removing the Holter monitor please don’t use scissors as it is easy to cut the leads.
  • Holter monitoring is available through your veterinary surgeon or the referring cardiologist. Some breed clubs have their own monitor and recordings are analysed by a veterinary cardiologist.